Discography (details)

Compact Discs

Brotherhood | 1659 | Bayda | European Tour 2003
Golden Echoes of Kyiv | Ukrainian Steppe | A Bandura Christmas
Black Sea Tour, Ukraine | Ukrainian Christmas Carols | Again With You, My Ukraine

 

Cassettes

Ukrainian Steppe | Millennium Concert 988-1988 | UBC Concert Tour 1983
UBC Concert Tour 1975 | Christmas Carols | Black Sea Tour, Ukraine
Best of Kapella, vol. I | Again With You, My Ukraine | Christmas Night

 


 

Brotherhood

Brotherhood

The Brotherhood Concert Series was a collaboration of the Detroit-based Ukrainian Bandurist Chorus (UBC), under the direction of Oleh Mahlay, and the Winnipeg-based Hoosli Ukrainian Male Chorus, under the direction of William Solomon. Two concerts were presented: one in St. Catharines, Ontario on Friday, September 21, 2012 at the Cathedral of St. Catherine of Alexandria, and one in Toronto, Ontario on Saturday, September 22, 2012 at Ryerson Theatre.

In March 2011, the leadership of both ensembles began discussing the impact that a joint performance of 70 of the most dedicated male chorus singers and bandura players in North America could have, not just on the members of Hoosli and the UBC, but on the entire Ukrainian community in North America.

This collaborative effort brought together groups from both sides of the Canadian-American border who share the common mission of bringing forth the majestic sound of four-part male harmony and the Ukrainian musical tradition to the world. Drawing inspiration from their ancestral homeland, the men in these groups invoke the spirit and legacy of the kobzari and kozaky with every performance. It is in honour of those very legends of Ukrainian culture that Brotherhood was chosen as such a fitting title for these concerts. The camaraderie and fraternity that was shared between kobzari and amongst kozaky is akin to the incredible connection that the members of these two ensembles feel every time they meet.

The repertoires of both groups cover an incredible breadth of Ukrainian choral and bandura music, and include compositions and arrangements from an illustrious list of the most renowned musical talents of Ukraine and North America. Featuring works by names like Bortniansky and Lysenko and Kytasty, and especially the poignant lyrics of Taras Shevchenko, the combined music libraries of the UBC and Hoosli paint a rich tapestry expressing Ukraine's history and culture through music. Every time a song that tells of the legacy of the Ukrainian people is sung by Hoosli or the UBC, each man's voice spiritually joins the brotherhood of those great icons of Ukrainian culture. Through brotherhood, we can all share these unique songs with you and pass on the great gifts of Ukrainian culture and history from generation to generation.

HOOSLI UKRAINIAN MALE CHORUS

1. ACROSS THE BROAD FIELD (Через поле широкеє) - S. Huminilovych
Soloist: M. N. Burdeniuk
CHRIST IS RISEN! (Христос Воскрес!) - A. Vedel (male chorus arrangement by W. Bohonos) Across the Broad Field paints a sorrowful picture of Christ’s final hours, which transitions into Christ is Risen!, proclaiming His glorious Resurrection.

2. CHERUBIC HYMN (Херувимська пісня) - W. Bohonos (Kyiv Monastery of the Caves chant) A song from the Divine Liturgy honoring the cherubim.

3. THE BLACK CLOUD RISES (Чорна хмара з-за лиману) - A. Kyzyma (words by T. Shevchenko) Soloist: M. Chabluk
The Kozaks sail from the Dnipro Delta onto the stormy Black Sea. “Let’s visit the Sultan in Tsarhorod (Istanbul).” The Otaman (Kozak Chieftan) leads them into battle as they sing.

4. THE CARPATHIAN HIGHLANDS (Верховино) - W. Bohonos (folk song)
There is no place as wonderful as the highlands of the Carpathian Mountains, where I can dance with my dark browed girl.

5. THREE KOZAKS RODE IN (Їхали три запорожці) - A. Dmytrovych (folk song)
Three young men ride into town, all vying to marry the same young girl. Her mother invites the young men into the house in order to evaluate the prospective suitors for her daughter.

6. HARVESTERS ON THE HILL (Гей на горі там женці жнуть) - N. Nyzhankivsky
As the harvesters work on the hill, the Kozaks ride through the valley, shattering the silence with their boisterous singing, as Doroshenko and Sahaydachny lead their armies into battle.

UKRAINIAN BANDURIST CHORUS

7. THE SINGING FOREST (Ой дівчино, шумить гай) - H. Kytasty
A merry folk song about courtship and love, and how a young couple plans for the future.

8. THROUGH THE ORCHARD (Садом, садом кумасенько) - H. Kytasty (folk song) A humorous song, set in an orchard, recounts a tale of forbidden love.

9. UKRAINIAN DANCE SONG MEDLEY (Танкова в`язанка) - M. Mykhailov Soloist: T. Zakordonski
THE CRANE...THE NOISE AND THE CLAMOR...FROM KYIV TO LUBEN Three merry dance pieces driven by the fast fingers of the bandura players.

10. SONG OF KOZAK NECHAY (Козак Нечай) - O. Koshyts
Soloists: L. Laschuk & I. Stasiuk
17th century Kozak leader Danylo Nechay protected the Ukrainian peasantry from the Polish nobility, working hand in hand with the famous Bohdan Khmelnytsky.

11. CARPATHIAN FREEDOM FIGHTERS (Карпатські січовики) - H. Kytasty (words by Y. Slavutych)
This song recounts the fight for the liberation of Carpatho-Ukraine in 1938, where Carpathian riflemen distinguished themselves in battle.

BROTHERHOOD CHORUS

12. PLAY, BANDURA, PLAY (Грай, бандуро, грай) – I. Shamo (words by D. Lutsenko)
Conducted by W. Solomon
The Zaporozhian Kozaks call on the bandura players to lead them into battle with songs of the beauty of the land they are defending.

13. IN THE EVENING (Вечір надворі) – A. Bobyr (folk song)
Conducted by W. Solomon
Soloists: M. A. Burdeniuk & M. Gowda
It is evening, and night is approaching. Come out, my darling, for my heart longs for you.

14. GOOD EVENING, MY LOVE (Ой гиля, гиля) – H. Kytasty (folk song)
Conducted by O. Mahlay
Soloists: C. Rawluk, L. Yakimiv, J. Burdeniuk, & O. Zmiyiwsky A love song depicting the courtship of a young couple.

15. THE MIGHTY DNIPRO (Реве та стогне Дніпр широкий) – H. Kytasty
(words by T. Shevchenko, music by D. Kryzhanivsky)
Conducted by O. Mahlay
This popular and moving adaptation of Shevchenko’s poem depicts the grand and mighty river, a metaphor for the will and strength of Ukrainians.

16. MANY YEARS (Многая літа) – O. Mahlay (Halychyna style)
Conducted by O. Mahlay
The traditional Ukrainian song of well-wishing for all occasions.

Ukrainian Bandurist Chorus – Artistic Director and Conductor: Oleh Mahlay
Hoosli Ukrainian Male Chorus – Conductor: William Solomon
Recording Engineer and Mixer: Orest Sushko
Recorded at: Ryerson Theatre, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Design Concept: Andrij Zwarych
CD Design & Layout: Myles Burdeniuk
Executive Producers: Anatoli W. Murha & Christopher Sklepowich

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1659

In 1659, Ukraine was under siege for over two months as the invading Russian troops greatly outnumbered the Ukrainian forces at Konotop – a city in northeastern Ukraine close to the Russian border.  Determination, timely strategy, and bravery resulted in a great victory for Ukraine, as the retreating Russian forces fled back to Moscow.  Sadly, many Ukrainians who live in the city of Konotop know not of the great victory of their people that took place over 350 years ago on their own land.  Centuries of Russian attempts at eradicating Ukrainian culture and the Soviet terror that followed have "changed" the accounts of history in order to weaken and eliminate a Ukrainian self-consciousness. 

This recording not only honors the great Battle at Konotop, but relives some of the triumphs and tragedies that have occurred since 1659.  The great poet Taras Shevchenko, in his Testament, inspires us to "rise and break the shackles," and many of the songs you hear heed this advice.  The Gathering Eagles depict the haydamaky as they fight against social injustice in the 18th century.   March Ukraine! and the Song about Yuriy Tiutiunnyk remind of us of 20th century battles for liberty.  In Good Evening, My Love, we take time to visit the lyrical beauty of Ukrainian folk songs.  While we honor the Ukrainian Bandurist Chorus' home since 1949 in America the Beautiful, we do not forget the horror the group left behind in the genocide that killed 7 to 10 million Ukrainians in 1932-33 (The Black-Tilled Earth).  It is through Ukrainian song and the beautiful bandura that this rich history comes to life.

The spirit, valor, and sacrifice of those that we sing about help shape our lives in the 21st century as well.  Members of the Ukrainian Bandurist Chorus have been fighting, in their own way, to preserve the Ukrainian culture, history, and traditions since 1918.  This recording is our humble contribution to "Save Our Song."  We hope to uncover the pages of a buried history and reveal the beauty of the Ukrainian culture to those that follow.

Ukraine March - music by H. Kytasty (words by I. Bahrianyj)
soloists:  M. Gowda and L. Yakimiv
A World War II era patriotic poem that inspires Ukrainians to fight for their motherland.

The Clouds Are Rising - music by V. Yemetz (words by T. Shevchenko)
The Gathering Eagles - music by K. Stetsenko (words by T. Shevchenko)
Ukraine reflects on its people's fate of bondage and serfdom in The Clouds Are RisingThe Gathering Eagles recounts the liberation of the city of Chyhyryn by kozaks gathered with the speed of eagles to rise against the Polish gentry.

The Battle of Konotop - music by H. Kytasty (words by P. Karepnko-Krynycia)
soloists: J. Zinchuk (the kobzar); A. Soroka (Colonel Hulianytsky); I. Stasiuk (Hetman Vyhovsky)  /  narrators: Z. Chaikovsky and P. Stoykiv  /  percussion: R. Beley and Z. Chaikovsky
Konotop, in the northeastern part of Ukraine, was besieged for three months by Russian troops in the summer of 1659 during the Ukrainian-Muscovite War.  Hetman Vyhovsky, who came to the town's aid, killed or scattered over 30,000 Russians and captured 5,000.  This epic work is able to convey the tragedy of war as well as the triumph of the Ukrainian army over the Russians.

Song about Yuriy Tiutiunnyk - music by H. Kytasty (words by I. Bahrianyj)
soloists: I. Kusznir and L. Yakimiv
General Yuriy Tiutiunnyk (1891-1929) led the "Winter Campaigns" from 1919-1921 against the Bolsheviks.

The Black Tilled Earth - music by S. Liudkevych
soloists: M. Gowda and I. Krislaty
A lament dedicated by the Ukrainian Bandurist Chorus to the estimated 7 to 10 million Ukrainian victims of the terror and intentional famine perpetrated by the Soviet leadership in 1932-33.

America the Beautiful - music by S. Ward (words by K. Bates)
soloist: I. Kusznir
Poet writer Katharine Lee Bates was inspired by all the natural wonder displayed as she viewed the American countryside from the top of Colorados' Pike's Peak.

Good Evening, My Love - folk song, arranged by H. Kytasty
soloists: T. Zakordonski and J. Zinchuk
A love song depicting the courtship of a young couple.

My Testament - music by H. Khotkevych (words by T. Shevchenko)
This moving setting of the famous Taras Shevchenko text beseeches the Ukrainian people to arise, break the shackles of tyranny, and become a free united nation.

People, Save Our Song! - music by V. Lytvyn (words by P. Perebiynis)
soloists: V. Brechun, A. Soroka, T. Pryshlak and L. Yakimiv
This recently written poem implores Ukrainians to save their song, culture, and language before it is too late.

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Bayda

DETROIT – The all-male Ukrainian Bandurist Chorus (Kapelia Bandurystiv im. T. Shevchenka) announces the release of its newest and most anticipated recording - Bayda. With over 60 minutes of music, this recording takes you on a musical journey of Ukraine from the historic kozak fortress of Prince Bayda to the banks of the mighty Dnipro River. This recording is offered on compact disc only and is available for purchase as of December 6, 2006. Select composers on the recording include: O. Koshyts, H. Khotkevych, M. Mykhailov, H. Kytasty, M. Lysenko, and O. Mahlay. This recording is yet another example of the wide-ranging repertoire of the Ukrainian Bandurist Chorus (UBC).

The title song of the recording, Bayda, tells a story of Prince Dmytro "Bayda" Vyshnevetsky – the first kozak otaman in the history of Ukraine and a founding member of the kozak nobility. He was taken prisoner by the Turks and executed in Istanbul in 1563. Hnat Khotkevych's orchestration sets the scene for the showdown between Bayda and the Turkish sultan. Ukrainian and Turkish musical themes appear throughout the song. Solo performances by Andrew Soroka as the Sultan and John Zinchuk as Bayda bring the story together.

Other selections from the recording include: Song of Kozak Nechay, Hamalia Suite, Medley of Ukrainian Dance Songs, Yatran, Song of the Gray Cuckoo, The Horn-Owl On The Grave, and The Mighty Dnipro River. Many solo performances by Teodozij Pryshlak, Ihor Kusznir, Ihor Stasiuk, Taras Zakordonski, Victor Sheweli, and Mychail Newmerzyckyj are highlighted on the recording in addition to a bandura solo by Orest Sklierenko and smaller bandura ensemble performances. The bandura is featured on two instrumental (bandura only) tracks - Song Dance and The Kozak Road.

This recording was made possible in part by many supporters of the UBC. All sponsors are listed in the CD booklet.

The first public release will be held in Parma, Ohio on Saturday, December 9. The recording is available to purchase online with a credit card at www.bandura.org. To order by check, please call 734.953.0305.

Founded in 1918, the Ukrainian Bandurist Chorus has a long and proud history of representing Ukrainian bandura and choral music on the international stage. Boasting a repertoire of more than 500 songs, this internationally celebrated and award-winning ensemble has captivated audiences in major concert halls in the United States, Canada, Europe, Australia, and Ukraine since immigrating to North America from Europe in 1949. They have also performed for such noted personalities as former President Richard Nixon, former President Ronald Reagan, movie star Jack Palance, and former President of Ukraine Leonid Kravchuk. Most recently, the Ukrainian Bandurist Chorus was featured at the internationally renowned Stratford Summer Music Festival, and presented Bandura Christmas International with Metropolitan Opera soloist Paul Plishka.

From the UBC Press Packet, 2006

SONG OF KOZAK NECHAY
Ukrainian folk song - O. Koshyts
soloists: Ihor Kusznir and Ihor Stasiuk
17th century kozak leader Danylo Nechay protected the Ukrainian peasantry from the Polish nobility, working hand in hand with the famous Bohdan Khmelnytsky. Nechay died heroically in battle in 1651 while engaged against a numerically superior Polish force. For his heroism and ideals, Nechay has been glorified in many historical songs.

HAMALIA SUITE
words by T. Shevchenko / music by M. Lysenko
"The courageous Otaman Hamalia gathered his men and took to the sea. While sailing the open seas seeking glory, he saved our brethren from Turkish captivity."
There is No Wind Nor Waves
soloist: Orest Sklierenko (bandura)
The Blue Sea
Our Dear God

soloist: Taras Zakordonski
bandura ensemble: Bohdan Koshil, Zenon Krislaty, YuriyMetulynsky, Anatoli Murha, Andrij Sklierenko, Orest Sklierenko, Roman Skypakewych
Let Us Hear Our Glory
Onward to Turkey!

SONG DANCE (instrumental piece)
H. Kytasty
Skillfully weaving an old folk song, Hryhory Kytasty, the beloved former artistic director of the Ukrainian Bandurist Chorus, highlights the wondrous sounds of the bandura.

MEDLEY OF UKRAINIAN DANCE SONGS
M. Mykhailov
soloist: Victor Sheweli
The Crane . . . The Noise and the Clamor . . . From Kyiv to Luben. Three merry dance pieces driven by the fast fingers of the bandura players.

BAYDA
H. Khotkevych
soloists: Andrew Soroka (the Sultan) and John Zinchuk (Bayda)
Darius Polanski (percussion)

Prince Dmytro "Bayda" Vyshnevetsky was the first kozak otaman in the history of Ukraine - a founding member of the kozak nobility. In or about 1552 he built a fort on the island of Mala Khortytsia on the Dnipro River, recruiting warriors to battle against the Tatars. He was taken prisoner by the Turks and executed in Istanbul in 1563. Bandurist Hnat Khotkevych's rich orchestration sets the scene for the showdown between Bayda and the Turkish sultan. Ukrainian and Turkish musical themes appear, the freedom-loving kozaks mock the Sultan, and Bayda is defiant until the very end.


Captured by the Turks, the Sultan makes Bayda an offer: I will give you your freedom if you stop your military campaigns and take my daughter's hand in marriage. Bayda responds by expressing his displeasure with the appearance of the daughter, and then proclaiming that the Sultan's faith is damned. Outraged by this insult, the Sultan orders that Bayda be tied and hung on a large hook by his chest. Bayda, as a last dying gesture, asks for a bow and arrow in order to shoot a dove for the Sultan's dinner. The Sultan foolishly obliges, and Bayda finds a new target: the Sultan's head.

THE HORN-OWL ON THE GRAVE
Ukrainian Folk Song - O. Mahlay
soloists: Teodozij Pryshlak and Andrew Soroka
The battle-weary kozaks lament their misfortune. While they notice their rusty swords and faulty muskets, they proclaim that their hearts still do not fear the enemy. But they are saddened again: "We once ruled our lands, but will no longer. Our kozak glory, however, shall not be forgotten."

THE KOZAK ROAD (instrumental piece)
O. Mahlay
bandura ensemble: Bohdan Koshil, Zenon Krislaty, Oleh Mahlay, Yuriy Metulynsky, Anatoli Murha, Andrij Sklierenko, Orest Sklierenko, Roman Skypakewych
These four folk songs chronicle the many roads traveled by Ukrainian kozaks. The first song (The Sycamore by the Water) remembers the fate of Ukrainian kozak regiments who in the 1710's took part in the draining of the marshes and digging the canals for the expansion of St. Petersburg, Russia. The human toll was great as many would say for centuries that "St. Petersburg was built on the bones of the Ukrainian kozaks." The kozak spirit cannot be defeated, as The Raging Blowing Winds guide them forward. The merry Kubanskiy Dance is from a region southeast of present day Ukraine where many Ukrainian kozaks emigrated after the destruction of the Zaporizka Sich in 1775 by Catherine the Great. Our journey concludes with the popular Ukrainian song The Reapers On The Hill as the warriors march on.

YATRAN
Ukrainian folk song - O. Mahlay
soloist: Mychail Newmerzyckyj
The Yatran River in central Ukraine is the setting for this song depicting Ukraine's struggle under Polish serfdom. While the beautiful young girl has a family and a wonderful home, the orphaned young man laments that the steppe is his matchmaker, his sword and pipe his only family, and his gray steed his brother.

SONG OF THE GRAY CUCKOO
words and music - P. Nishchinsky
soloist: Teodozij Pryshlak
The cuckoo called at dawn while the Ukrainian kozaks sang their mournful song in Turkish captivity. They beseeched the wind to carry them over the sea, back to their beloved Ukraine. Instead, when their song is heard by the Turkish Sultan, he orders their chains be doubled.

THE MIGHTY DNIPRO RIVER
words by T. Shevchenko / music by H. Kytasty
Coursing its way through the heart of Ukraine, the Dnipro River has witnessed many events in the history of its people. This popular and moving adaptation of Taras Shevchenko's poem depicts the grand and mighty river - a metaphor for the will and strength of Ukrainians.

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European Tour 2003

 

The all-male Ukrainian Bandurist Chorus announces the release of their 31st North American produced album, coinciding with their 2004 Spring Concert Series in Syracuse, Hartford, New York City, and Philadelphia. European Tour: Historic Live Recordings presents an exciting program of select folk songs, and the exotic sounds of the bandura from the Chorus' 2003 European concert tour. Select composers include: J. Brahms, C, Gounod, H. Kytasty, M. Leontovich, J. Newton and O. Mahlay. This album is available on compact disc only.

This CD is unique in that it brings together a compilation of powerful performances captured at various concert halls over four countries. Emmy award winning Re-recording engineer Orest Sushko, who is also a member of the chorus, served as the mix engineer for this live project. Orest received an Emmy award in 2001 for outstanding mixing on the TV mini-series Nuremberg staring Alec Baldwin. Alex Kytasty, a Detroit based freelance recording engineer handled the location recording. Design and layout are credited to Darius Polanski, and production by Toronto based RDR Music Group. Executive Producer is Anatoli Murha.

From the UBC Press Packet, 2003

  1. PLAY, KOBZAR! H. Kytasty (words by T. Shevchenko). Recorded in Paris, France.
  2. THE ASH TREES. I. Kryvenky / soloists: I. Krislaty, I. Kusznir, O. Moroz, L. Yakimiv. Recorded in Munich, Germany.
  3. THE GIRL WHO SOLD HER HEART. Folk song – H. Kytasty. Recorded in Regensburg, Germany.
  4. MOONLIT AND STARRY NIGHT. Folk song – I. Kytasty / soloist: T. Zakordonski. Recorded in Vienna, Austria.
  5. THREE MERRY FOLK SONGS. Folk songs – D. Pika. Recorded in Regensburg, Germany.
  6. THE PIPER. M. Leontovich / soloists: A. Shrubowich & O. Sklierenko. Recorded in Vienna, Austria.
  7. THE EAGLE WALKS UPON THE SEA. Folk song / soloist: J. Zinchuk. Recorded in Paris, France.
  8. OJ, HOP TY NY NY. Folk song - D. Pika / soloist: L. Yakimiv. Recorded in Vienna, Austria.
  9. LULLABY. J. Brahms / soloist: T. Pryshlak. Recorded in Vienna, Austria.
  10. SOLDIER'S CHORUS. C. Gounod - from the opera "Faust". Recorded in St. Avold, France.
  11. AMAZING GRACE. Words and melody by J. Newton (arr. by O. Mahlay) / soloist: I. Kusznir. Recorded in Vienna, Austria.
  12. SONG ABOUT YURIJ TIUTIUNNYK H. Kytasty (words by I. Bahrianyj) / soloists: Mych. Newmerzyckyj & T. Zakordonski. Recorded in Munich, Germany.

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Ukrainian Steppe

 

Detroit - The Ukrainian Bandurist Chorus announced the release of their 28th North American-produced album, coinciding with their tour of the eastern United States and Canada in the fall of 1997. Selections include pieces ranging from a composition arranged by one of the Chorus' directors of the 1930's to a world premiere of a piece composed in Ukraine exclusively for the Chorus. The recording presents an exciting program of folk songs, religious works, and the exotic sounds of the bandura. This album is available on cassette & compact disc.

The Ukrainian Bandurist Chorus is an all-male musical ensemble consisting of 20 instrumentalists and 40 vocalists. Originally founded in Kyiv, Ukraine in 1918, the ensemble relocated to Detroit, Michigan in 1949. Boasting a repertoire of more than 500 songs, this internationally celebrated ensemble has performed at Carnegie Hall, the Kyiv Opera House, Kennedy Center, and Massey Hall. They have also performed for such notable personalities as Presidents Nixon and Eisenhower, the U. S. Senate as well as numerous foreign dignitaries.

From the UBC Press Packet, 1997

PROGRAM

  1. In Thy Kingdom -- U Tsarstvi Tvoim. This Kyivan chant is taken from the Divine Liturgy, cluminating with the proclamation: "Rejoice and be exceedingly glad, for great is your reward in heaven." The Kyivan Monastery of the Caves, the birthplace of this chant, dates back to the 11th century. Arrangement -- Oleh Mahlay.
  2. Prayer of mercy -- Pid Tvoyu Milist'. This solemn prayer, traditionally sung at the conclusion of Vespers, beseeches the Virgin Mary to guide and protect. Music -- S. Liudkevych.
  3. Amazing Grace This well-known hymn was written by a former slave trader turned preacher, and is set to the bandura by the director of the Chorus. Words/music -- J. Newton, arrangement -- O. Mahlay. Soloist: Jerome Cisaruk.
  4. The Gray Cuckoo -- Zakuvala Syva Zozulen'ka. This folk song from the Kuban region describes a widower's request to be placed near the grave of his departed loved one, for the chance to be reborn at her side. The bandura players showcase the Khrakiv style of bandura playing. Oleksander Koshets.
  5. Oy Hop Ty Ny Ny! -- Oy Hop Ty Ny Ny. This humorous song is comprised of various Ukrainian melodies as arranged by a former director of the Chorus from the 1930's. Danylo Pika. Soloist: Pavlo Pysarenko.
  6. The Lake in the Field -- Oj U Poli Ozerechko. The young lover asks his girl to come out and speak to him for a moment, to sway her into leaving the husband she does not love. Ukrainian Folk Song. Soloist: Ihor Kusznir.
  7. Echo of the Steppes -- Homin' Stepiv. This quintessential bandura composition illustrates the tumultuos events that have played themselves out on the fertile plains of Ukraine. The unique use of the instrument depicts the co-existence of man and nature on the vast kozak steppe, catching the essence of the stiff breezes sweeping though the tall grass. Music -- Hyrhory Kytasty.
  8. The Chumaks -- Chumaky. A chumak was a teamster who drove his salt-laden oxen casrts along long, tortuous roads from the Black Sea to the cities. This world premiere piece, written specifically for the Chorus, describes the despair of a mother as her son leaves for the grueling road. Lyrics/music -- L. Dychko. Soloist: Omelan Helbig.
  9. Duma About Ukraine -- Duma Pro Ukrainu. A duma is an epic ballad historically sung by blind bandura minstrels (kobzars). This duma depicts Ukraine as a bloodied, shackled woman, who cries out to her sons, the nation's heroes, to free her from the enemy's hold. This duma ends with a call to arms, proclaiming that freedom is near. Traditional Duma. Soloist: Marko Farion.
  10. Grandfather Jerome -- Did Jarema In this humorous folk song Grandpa tracks the courtship and marriages of twenty sons to twenty daughters. Soloist: Petro Kytasty.
  11. Song About Mazepa -- Pisnia Pro Mazepu. Ivan Mazepa (1639-1709), a Ukrainian leader (hetman), promulgated literature, churches education, and the free Ukrainian nation during the kozak era. In this song, Hetman Mazepa bids farewell to his kozak homeland after the defeat by Russia's Peter the Great at the Battle of Poltava in 1709. Although Mazepa wonders whether he will ever see his ruined homeland, he would never return to Ukraine. M. Stepanenko, arrangement -- Victor Mishalow. Soloist: Mykhail Newmerzyckyj.
  12. Song of Yurij Tiutiunnyk -- Pisnya Pro Yuriya Tiutiunnyka. Tiutiunnyk was the celebrated leader of the Ukrainian Cavalry who won renown in battles against the Bolshevik Army (1918-1921). This song was the first in a series of collaborations of composer Hryhory Kytasty with author/lyricist Ivan Bahriany.
  13. Brothers, Let us Fill Our Glasses! -- Nalyvaymo Brattya. "... so the enemies' swords and bullets will pass us by." A traditional kozak song. Arrangement -- O. Mahlay. Duet: Teodozij Pryshliak and Jerome Cisaruk.
  14. Kolomyjka -- Kolomyjka. A popular Ukrainian festive song. Any Ukrainian knows at least one verse to this song and the refrain "oj daj dunaj...". The last verse directs the elderly to go on home as the younger ones will party all night! Arrangement: A. Hnatyshyn. Duet: T. Pryshliak and Andrij Soroka.
  15. God Grant Thee Many Years! -- Mnohaya Lita. The proclamation is given asking God to grant kobzars (bandura minstrels), the Ukrainian nation, and all God-fearing people, "many years" (mnohaya lita!) Intonation: M. Farion.

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Golden Echoes of Kyiv

 

Golden Echoes of Kyiv - This recording of the Ukrainian Bandurist Chorus features the Divine Liturgy in a traditional a capella setting. The liturgy evolves as a sonic metamorphosis from traditional chant, through polyphony, then finally discovering 300 years of Ukrainian sacred music. This recording features composers such as Dyletskiy, Berezovsky, Koshyts, Bortniansky, Stetsenko, Leontovych, Verbytsky, Kytasty, Lysenko, and Hnatyshyn.

Read a review of "Golden Echoes" from the Detroit Free Press, March 30, 2003 "Ukraine's Sacred Side" by David Lyman. www.freep.com/entertainment/music/disc30_20030330.htm

"...this is a noteworthy musical document filled with majestic ensemble work and dozens of fine solo performances..." - David Lyman, Detroit Free Press, March 30, 2003.

PROGRAM

  1. Great Litany - O.Mahlay
  2. First Antiphon (Psalm 102) - kyivan chant
  3. Small Litany -O.Mahlay
  4. Glory … Only Begotten Son - M.Dyletsky
  5. Small Litany - kyivan chant
  6. Third Antiphon (Matthew 5:3-11) - kyivan chant
  7. Come, Let Us Worship - M.Berezovsky
  8. Tropar Tone 2 halycian chant - M.Fedoriv
  9. Thrice-Holy Hymn - O.Koshyts
  10. Is Polla Eti Despota - D.Bortniansky
  11. Prokeimonon Tone 2 - Kyiv Monastery of the Caves
  12. Epistle Reading
  13. Alleluia - kyivan chant
  14. Litany of Fervent Supplication - kyivan chant
  15. Cherubic Hymn - D.Bortniansky
  16. Litany of Supplication - K.Stetsenko
  17. Father, Son, & Holy Spirit - K.Stetsenko
  18. The Symbol of Faith - M.Telezhinsky
  19. Eucharistic Prayer - kyivan chant
  20. We Praise You - kyivan chant
  21. Proper to Mother of God - kyivan chant
  22. The Lord's Prayer - N.Dubensky
  23. One is Holy - anonymous
  24. Praise the Lord - M.Verbytsky
  25. We Have Seen The True Light - M.Leontovych
  26. May Our Mouths Be Filled With Praise -M.Leontovych
  27. Litany of Thanksgiving - H.Kytasty
  28. Blessed be the Name of the Lord - A.Hnatyshyn
  29. Glory to the Father - A.Hnatyshyn
  30. Amen - A.Hnatyshyn
  31. Prayer for Ukraine - M.Lysenko (O.Koshyts)

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A Bandura Christmas

 

PROGRAM

  1. Today We Sing --Dnes' Poyushche. "Let us all sing to proclaim the glory of the Son of God." Arrangement -- Kyrylo Stetsenko. Soloist: Jarema Cisaruk.
  2. A New Joy Has Arisen -- Nova Radist' Stala. The joy of Jesus Christ's birth and the bright star above His manger light up the entire world. Arrangement -- K. Stetsenko
  3. Adeste Fideles -- "O Come All Ye Faithful". Arrangement -- Oleh Mahlay.
  4. The Landlord's Carol -- A U Tsoho Hazyayna. Flickering candles illuminate the warm interior of the family home as they prepare for the holidays. Arrangement -- K. Stetsenko / O. Mahlay. Soloist: Victor Sheweli
  5. Christmas Motives -- Rizdvyani Motyvy. A triptych of favorite Ukrainian seasonal songs featuring the bandurists. Arrangement -- Hryhory Kytasty: In Bethlehem -- Y Vefleyemi, Let Us Rejoice -- Vozveselimsya, Shchedryk -- Shchedryk.
  6. On the River Jordan -- Oy Na Jordani. Mother Mary bathes the young babe in the River Jordan. Arrangement -- Oleksander Koshyts / O. Mahlay. Soloist: J. Cisaruk. Violin: O. Mahlay.
  7. The News in Bethlehem -- Vo Vefleyemi Novyna. An intricate carol arranged by Ukrainian-Canadian composer Zenon Lawryshyn utilizes many effects of the bandura.
  8. I Wonder as I Wander -- Ya Divlusya Ta Mandruyu. An Appalachian carol set to the bandura. Niles / O.Mahlay. Soloist: Ihor Kusznir.
  9. The Saints -- Svyati Sidily. The saints labor to built a beautiful church with three steeples and three windows. Arrangement -- Volodymyr Bozhyk. Soloists: Omelan Helbig and Marko Farion.
  10. Throughout the World -- Po Vsiomu Sviti. Joyful tidings of Christ's birth echo across the land. Arrangement -- K. Stetsenko. Duet: Pavlo Pysarenko and Oleh Moroz.
  11. O, Holy Night -- O, Svyataya Nich. This perennial seasonal favorite is set to the flowing strings of the bandura. Arrangement -- A. Adams / M. Farion.
  12. Shchedryk -- What has been known to the world as Carol of the Bells is actually an old Ukrainian seasonal winter song (shchedrivka).
  13. Silent Night -- Tyha Nich. Stille Nacht, sung in English, German, and Ukrainian. Franz Gruber / H. Kytasty. Soloist: Teodozij Pryshlak.
  14. Oh, Koliada! -- The Ukrainian word for carol is koliada. This playful carol asks the listening household to fill the carolers' pockets with food and money . . . or else. Music -- O. Mahlay. Soloists: Zenon Chaikovsky and Andrij Soroka.
  15. God Eternal -- Boh Predvichnyj. This favorite Ukrainian carol can be heard throughout the world in all Ukrainian homes and churches on Christmas Day. Arrangement -- H. Kytasty.

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Black Sea Tour, Ukraine

 

Chorus' 27th North American-produced album, containing live recordings from their historic 1994 concert tour of southern Ukraine, including the region of Crimea. It was released as UBC CD 2 and UBC Cassette 8.

PROGRAM

Compac Disc Number One

  1. The Cherubic Hymn -- Kheruvymska. An integral part of the Eastern Rite Liturgy, this Cherubicon was penned by Ukraine's most prolific 18th century composer Dmytro Bortniansky (1751-1825), a contemporary of W. A. Mozart. Trio: Roman Kassaraba, Boris Kekish, and Mykola Kostiuk.
  2. I Do Not Regret the Years -- Ne Shkoduyu Za Litamy. '... but I do regret that I am not with you in my native land.' The last composition of the Chorus' longtime director Hryhory Kytasty. Lyrics -- Oleksander Pidsukha (1918-1990). Soloist: Ihor Kusznir.
  3. Play, Bandura! -- Hray, Banduro! A battle song composed by Ihor Shamo (1925-1982), with the Zaporozhian Cossacks (Kozaks) calling on the bandura players to lead them into battle with songs of the beauty of the land they are defending. Lyrics -- D. Luczenko.
  4. The Grove -- Hayu, Hayu. A folk song about love lost due to others' gossip and innuendo, arranged by the composer chiefly known for the piece Carol of the Bells Mykola Leontovych (1877-1921). Soloist: Teodozij Pryshliak.
  5. Song of Yuriy Tiutiunnyk -- Pisnya Pro Yuriya Tiutiunnyka. Tiutiunnyk was the celebrated leader of the Ukrainian Cavalry who won renown in battles against the Bolshevik Army (1918-1921). This song was the first in a series of collaborations of composer H. Kytasty with author/lyricist Ivan Bahriany (1907-1963). Duet: R. Kassarab and T. Pryshliak.
  6. Girl from Yalta -- Shu Yaltadan. A Crimean Tatar song arranged by the contemporary Tatar composer Iliasa Bashysh. Soloist: Pavlo Pysarenko.
  7. The Singing Forest -- Oy Divchyno Shumit' Hay. A merry folk song about courtship and love, and how the young couple plans for the future. Arrangement -- H. Kytasty.
  8. Too Much of a Girl! -- Oy Vazhu, Ya Vazhu! A humorous folk song about a boy who wavers on commitment to an aggressive girl and finally flees. Arrangement -- H. Kytasty.
  9. Storm on the Black Sea (Duma) -- Burya Na Chornomu Mori. This is an orchestrated work of a 16th century duma. This piece was written by Hnat Khotkevych, but was banned by Stalin due to its religious connotation. As the Kozaks set sail on the Black Sea - a storm engulfs them. They realize that it is the wrath of God and the one who had sinned needs to confess and throw himself into the sea to save the others... Soloists: Jerome Cisaruk and T. Pryshliak.

Compac Disc Number Two

  1. God Bless America. Irving Berlin, one of the 20th century's most prolific songwriters, and the composer/lyricist of this piece, was born in Ukraine in 1888. The Chorus added this piece to their repertoire prior to their Carnegie Hall appearance in 1983 in honor of his 95th birthday.
  2. The Chumak Song -- Oy, Tam Chumak. A chumak was a teamster who led his salt-laden oxen carts along long, tortuous roads from the Black Sea and Crimea to the cities. This is a lament of one such chumak who comes to the end of his road, and has said farewell to his oxen... Arrangement -- H. Kytasty. Soloist: Mykhail Newmerzyckyj.
  3. Play, Kobzar! -- Hray, Kobzariu! The kobzar is asked to play as the Kozaks sing a joyful song and dance 'so that the earth trembles'. Composed by H. Kytasty, the words are penned by Ukraine's 19th century bard Taras Shevchenko (1814-1861).
  4. The Clouds are Rising -- Vstaye Khmara. Ukraine laments its people's fate of bondage and serfdom through the words of T. Shevchenko. Composed by Vasyl Yemetz, the Chorus' founder and first director in 1918.
    The Gathering Eagles -- Haydamatska Pisnya. An historical song from the 18th century which tells of the liberation of Chyhyryn by Kozaks gathered with the speed of eagles to rise against the Polish gentry. Lyrics -- T. Shevchenko; music -- Kyrylo Stetsenko (1882-1922).
  5. The Slave Market in Kaffa -- Nevilnychyj Rynok U Kafi. This piece features the bandura as it paints the scene of a Turkish slave market at Kaffa, the present-day city of Feodosia in the Crimea, where Ukrainian men, women, and children were sold during the 16th and 17th centuries. While Turkish motifs are ever-pervasive throughout, in the end, it is a Ukrainian folk melody that finally emerges from the sounds of the market. Music -- H. Khotkevych. Prologue: Arnold Birko.
  6. Whose Courtyard is This? -- Oy Chyj Tse Dvir? A humorous song about a young man who states that he would marry the girl, but only if she was wealthy. Arrangement -- H. Kytasty.
  7. The Carpathian Freedom Fighters -- Karpatsky Sichovnyky. The Chorus concluded its Black Sea Tour program with this piece. Composed by H. Kytasty with lyrics by Yar Slavutych, this piece recounts the fight for liberation of Carpatho-Ukraine in 1938, where Carpathian riflemen distinguished themselves in battle. In the final verse, the Black Sea (Chorne More) receives the fallen heroes as the bodies of the freedom fighters spill out of the Danube into the Ukrainian sea.
  8. Medley of Ukrainian Folk Songs -- Vyazanka Tankovych Pisen'. This first encore presents three popular and humorous folk songs.
  9. Freedom Fighter's Farewell -- Ihal Strilets. This piece describes the parting of a strilets (Ukrainian soldier during World War I) and his loved one as he goes off to war. Soloists: I. Kusznir and P. Pysarenko.
    The Guilder-rose in the Meadow -- Oy U Luzi Chervona Kalyna. The kalyna (guilder-rose) is a symbol of Ukraine, and both the kalyna and the nation rise from the earth in this patriotic song. To many, this is an anthem second only to the official national anthem.
  10. Ukrainian National Anthem -- Shche Ne Vmerla Ukraina. After decades of not being heard on Ukrainian soil, this became the official national anthem of Ukraine following its independence in 1991. Lyrics -- Pavlo Chubynsky (1839-1884); music -- Mykhajlo Verbytsky (1815-1870).

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Ukrainian Carols

 

Detroit - The Ukrainian Bandurist Chorus announces the release of a digitally restored and remastered CD of their 1960 Christmas album Ukrainian Carols.

The message of Christmas is timeless - a message of peace, hope, and joyful tidings celebrating the birth of our Savior. The selections on this CD are the most loved carols of the Ukrainian people set to the beautiful sounds of the bandura. We hope you enjoy our music as you celebrate this Christmas and many more to come...

Three generations of members have passed through ranks of the Ukrainian Bandurist Chorus since its displacement from Ukraine in 1942. In addition to its mission of carrying the tradition of the bandura into the 21st century, the Chorus is also charged with preserving its past for future generations. This Compact Disc represents the first of many restorations of historical recordings by the Chorus. It is a re-issue of material recorded in 1960 on analog equipment. Although great care has been taken to preserve and restore the high audio quality of the music, some flaws may be heard due to the limitations of the original equipment used to make the recording.

The Ukrainian Bandurist Chorus, Laureate of the Taras Shevchenko Ukrainian State Prize, is an all-male musical ensemble consisting of 20 instrumentalists and 40 vocalists. Originally founded in Kyiv, Ukraine in 1918, the ensemble relocated to Detroit, Michigan in 1949. Boasting a repertoire of more than 500 songs, this internationally celebrated ensemble has performed at such well known theatres as Carnegie Hall, the Kyiv Opera House, Kennedy Center, the Bolshoi Theatre, and Massey Hall. They have also performed for such notable personalities as Presidents Nixon and Eisenhower, the U. S. Senate as well as numerous foreign dignitaries.

From the UBC Press Packet, 1998

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Again With You, My Ukraine

 

A live recording of the Ukrainian Bandurist Chorus in concert in Kyiv, Ukraine, 8 June 1991. This was the Chorus' first concert tour of Ukraine since World War II.

PROGRAM

  1. Testament -- Zapovit'. Taras Shevchenko's testament to his Ukrainian brethren. Music by Hnat Khotkevych.
  2. Praise the Lord, O My Soul -- Blahoslovy, Dushe Moya, Hospoda. Psalm 104, music by Kyrylo Stetsenko (1882-1922). Soloist: Petro Pacholuk.
  3. The Carpathian Freedom Fighters -- Karpatsky Sichovnyky. Composed by Hryhory Kytasty with lyrics by Yar Slavutych, this piece recounts the fight for liberation of Carpatho-Ukraine in 1938, where Carpathian riflemen distinguished themselves in battle. In the final verse, the Black Sea (Chorne More) receives the fallen heroes as the bodies of the freedom fighters spill out of the Danube into the Ukrainian sea.
  4. Country Tavern -- Korchomka. Arranged by H. Khotkevych. Soloist: Pavlo Pysarenko.
  5. Swans -- Lebedi Lyrics by M. Sytynka, music by H. Kytasty. Soloist: Yurij Oryshkevych.
  6. Bayda -- 16th century ballad about the capture of Prince Dmytro "Bajda" Vyshnevetsly by the Turkish Sultan. This epic poem is a dialogue between a defiant Bajda and the Sultan. Bajda manages to trick the and kill the Sultan before dying under torture. Arranged by H. Khotkevych. Soloists: Andrij Soroka and Bohdan Chaplynsky.
  7. Play, Kobzar! -- Hray Kobzariu! The kobzar is asked to play as the Kozaks sing a joyful song and dance 'so that the earth trembles'. Composed by H. Kytasty, the words are penned by Ukraine's 19th century bard Taras Shevchenko (1814-1861).
  8. Freedom Fighter's Farewell -- Ikhav Strilets'. This piece describes the parting of a strilets (Ukrainian soldier during World War I) and his loved one as he goes off to war. Soloists: Ihor Kusznir and P. Pysarenko.
    The Guilder-rose in the Meadow -- Oy U Poli Chervona Kalyna. The kalyna (guilder-rose) is a symbol of Ukraine, and both the kalyna and the nation rise from the earth in this patriotic song. To many, this is an anthem second only to the official national anthem.
  9. The Slave Market in Kaffa -- Nevilnychyj Rynok U Kafi. This piece features the bandura as it paints the scene of a Turkish slave market at Kaffa, the present-day city of Feodosia in the Crimea, where Ukrainian men, women, and children were sold during the 16th and 17th centuries. While Turkish motifs are ever-pervasive throughout, in the end, it is a Ukrainian folk melody that finally emerges from the sounds of the market. Music -- H. Khotkevych. Prologue: Victor Mishalow.
  10. Storm on the Black Sea (Duma) -- Burya Na Chornomu Mori. This is an orchestrated work of a 16th century duma. This piece was written by H. Khotkevych, but was banned by Stalin due to its religious connotation. As the Kozaks set sail on the Black Sea - a storm engulfs them. They realize that it is the wrath of God and the one who had sinned needs to confess and throw himself into the sea to save the others... Soloists: Jerome Cisaruk and Teodozij Pryshliak.
  11. Arise Ye People -- Vstavay Narode. Lyrics by Ivan Bahrianyj (1907-1963), music by H. Kytasty. Soloist: J. Cisaruk.

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Ukrainian Steppe

 

Detroit - The Ukrainian Bandurist Chorus announced the release of their 28th North American-produced album, coinciding with their tour of the eastern United States and Canada in the fall of 1997. Selections include pieces ranging from a composition arranged by one of the Chorus' directors of the 1930's to a world premiere of a piece composed in Ukraine exclusively for the Chorus. The recording presents an exciting program of folk songs, religious works, and the exotic sounds of the bandura. This album is available on cassette & compact disc.

The Ukrainian Bandurist Chorus is an all-male musical ensemble consisting of 20 instrumentalists and 40 vocalists. Originally founded in Kyiv, Ukraine in 1918, the ensemble relocated to Detroit, Michigan in 1949. Boasting a repertoire of more than 500 songs, this internationally celebrated ensemble has performed at Carnegie Hall, the Kyiv Opera House, Kennedy Center, and Massey Hall. They have also performed for such notable personalities as Presidents Nixon and Eisenhower, the U. S. Senate as well as numerous foreign dignitaries.

From the UBC Press Packet, 1997


PROGRAM

Side One

  1. In Thy Kingdom -- U Tsarstvi Tvoim. This Kyivan chant is taken from the Divine Liturgy, culminating with the proclamation: "Rejoice and be exceedingly glad, for great is your reward in heaven." The Kyivan Monastery of the Caves, the birthplace of this chant, dates back to the 11th century. Arrangement -- Oleh Mahlay.
  2. Prayer of mercy -- Pid Tvoyi Mylist. This solemn prayer, traditionally sung at the conclusion of Vespers, beseeches the Virgin Mary to guide and protect. Music -- Stanislav Liudkevych (1879-1979).
  3. Amazing Grace This well-known hymn was written by a former slave trader turned preacher, and is set to the bandura by the director of the Chorus. Words/music -- J. Newton, arrangement -- O. Mahlay. Soloist: Jerome Cisaruk.
  4. The Gray Cuckoo -- Zakuvala Syva Zozulya. This folk song from the Kuban region describes a widower's request to be placed near the grave of his departed loved one, for the chance to be reborn at her side. The bandura players showcase the Kharkiv style of bandura playing. Oleksander Koshyts (1875-1944).
  5. Oy Hop Ty Ny Ny! This humorous song is comprised of various Ukrainian melodies as arranged by a former director of the Chorus from the 1930's. Danylo Pika. Soloist: Pavlo Pysarenko.
  6. The Lake in the Field -- Oy U Poli Ozerechko. The young lover asks his girl to come out and speak to him for a moment, to sway her into leaving the husband she does not love. Ukrainian Folk Song. Soloist: Ihor Kusznir.
  7. Echo of the Steppes -- Homin' Stepiv. This quintessential bandura composition illustrates the tumultuous events that have played themselves out on the fertile plains of Ukraine. The unique use of the instrument depicts the co-existence of man and nature on the vast kozak steppe, catching the essence of the stiff breezes sweeping though the tall grass. Music -- Hyrhory Kytasty.
  8. The Chumaks -- Chumaky. A chumak was a teamster who drove his salt-laden oxen carts along long, tortuous roads from the Black Sea to the cities. This world premiere piece, written specifically for the Chorus, describes the despair of a mother as her son leaves for the grueling road. Lyrics/music -- Lesia Dychko (1939-). Soloist: Omelan Helbig.

 

Side Two

  1. Duma About Ukraine -- Duma Pro Ukrainu. A duma is an epic ballad historically sung by blind bandura minstrels (kobzars). This duma depicts Ukraine as a bloodied, shackled woman, who cries out to her sons, the nation's heroes, to free her from the enemy's hold. This duma ends with a call to arms, proclaiming that freedom is near. Traditional Duma. Soloist: Marko Farion.
  2. Grandfather Jerome -- Did Yarema. In this humorous folk song Grandpa tracks the courtship and marriages of twenty sons to twenty daughters. Soloist: Petro Kytasty.
  3. Song About Mazepa -- Pisnya Pro Mazepu. Ivan Mazepa (1639-1709), a Ukrainian leader (hetman), promulgated literature, churches education, and the free Ukrainian nation during the kozak era. In this song, Hetman Mazepa bids farewell to his kozak homeland after the defeat by Russia's Peter the Great at the Battle of Poltava in 1709. Although Mazepa wonders whether he will ever see his ruined homeland, he would never return to Ukraine. Mykhajlo Stepanenko (1942-), arrangement -- Victor Mishalow. Soloist: Mykhail Newmerzyckyj.
  4. Song of Yuriy Tiutiunnyk -- Pisnya Pro Yurija Tiutiunyka. Tiutiunnyk was the celebrated leader of the Ukrainian Cavalry who won renown in battles against the Bolshevik Army (1918-1921). This song was the first in a series of collaborations of composer H. Kytasty with author/lyricist Ivan Bahriany (1907-1963). Duet: Roman Kassaraba and T. Pryshliak.
  5. Brothers, Let us Fill Our Glasses! -- Nalyvajmo Brattya. "... so the enemies' swords and bullets will pass us by." A traditional kozak song. Arrangement -- O. Mahlay. Duet: T. Pryshliak and J. Cisaruk.
  6. Kolomyjka A popular Ukrainian festive song. Any Ukrainian knows at least one verse to this song and the refrain "oj daj dunaj...". The last verse directs the elderly to go on home as the younger ones will party all night! Arrangement: Andrij Hnatyshyn (1906-1995). Duet: T. Pryshliak and Andrij Soroka.
  7. God Grant Thee Many Years! -- Mnohaya Lita. The proclamation is given asking God to grant kobzars (bandura minstrels), the Ukrainian nation, and all God-fearing people, "many years" (mnohaya lita!) Intonation: M. Farion.

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Millennium Concert 988-1988

 

Excerpts from concerts to commemorate the millennium of Christianity in Ukraine. Recorded in Toledo, Ohio and Guelph, Ontario.


PROGRAM

Side One

  1. Blessed is the man (Psalm 1) -- Blazhen Muzh. A vesper hymn based on the ancient Kyivan chant, arranged by Andrij Hnatyshyn (1906-1995).
  2. Praise the Lord, O My Soul -- Blahoslovy Dushe Moya, Hospoda. Psalm 104, music by Kyrylo Stetsenko (1882-1922).
  3. Across the Filed -- Cherez Pole. Petro Honcharov (1888-1970).
  4. Prayer -- Vladyko Neba i Zemli. Semen Hulak-Artemovsky (1813-1873).

Side Two

  1. The Cherubic Hymn -- Kheruvymska. An integral part of the Eastern Rite Liturgy, this Cherubicon was penned by Ukraine's most prolific 18th century composer Dmytro Bortniansky (1751-1825), a contemporary of W. A. Mozart.
  2. The Divine Mother of Pochayiv -- Kant Pochaijvskyj Bozhoy Materi. A song dedicated to the Virgin Mary who, according to legend, miraculously appeared and saved the Pochayiv Monastery from the Tartars in the 15th century.
  3. Bayda A 16th century ballad about the capture of Prince Dmytro "Bajda" Vyshnevetsly by the Turkish Sultan. This epic poem is a dialogue between a defiant Bajda and the Sultan. Bajda manages to trick the and kill the Sultan before dying under torture. Arranged by Hnat Khotkevych (1877-1938).

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UBC Concert Tour 1983

 

These selections were recorded live during the Chorus' performance at Carnegie Hall.


PROGRAM

Side One

  1. God Bless America Irving Berlin, on of the 20th century's most prolific songwriters, and the composer/lyricist of this piece, was born in Ukraine in 1888.
  2. Blessed is the Man (Psalm 1) -- Blazhen Muzh. A vesper hymn based on the ancient Kyivan chant, arranged by Andrij Hnatyshyn (1906-1995).
  3. Shattered Dreams -- Rano Vrantsi. A fresh recruit marches off to war and returns wounded, only to find his village destroyed and his true love dead of grief. Kyrylo Stetsenko (1882-1922).
  4. In Turkey -- U Turkeni.
    Courting a Fickle Widow -- Ydovytsiu Ya Liubyv. Arranged by Hryhory Kytasty (1907-1984).
  5. For Love She Gave Her Soul -- Oj Provdala Divchonka Sertse. A folk song arranged by H. Kytasty.
  6. My Song -- Moya Pisnya. A love song by Mykola Leontovych (1877-1921).
  7. The Clouds Are Rising -- Vstaje Khmara. Ukraine laments her people's fate of bondage and serfdom through the words of Taras Shevchenko (1814-1861). Composed by Vasyl Yemetz (1890-1982), the Chorus's founder and director, in 1918.
    The Gathering Eagles -- Haydamatska Pisnya. An historical song from the 18th century which tells of the liberation of Chyhyryn by Kozaks gathered with the speed of eagles to rise against the Polish gentry. Lyrics -- T. Shevchenko; music -- K. Stetsenko.

  8. Glorious Zaporozhians -- Oy Ishly Hashi Slavni Zaporozhtsi. Historical ballad describing the fall of the Zaporozhian Sich.

  9. Country Tavern - Korchomka. Arranged by Hnat Khtokevych (1877-1938).


Side One

  1. Kozak Nechaj -- Kozak Nechay Arranged by H. Khotkevych.
  2. Green Hazelwood -- Zelenaya Ta Lishchynon'ka "... like the green hazel-tree fading from the sun because my loves comes not to me." Arranged by M. Leontovych.
    Variations on a Folk Theme Arranged by Serhij Bashtan.
  3. Too Much of a Girl -- Oy Vazhu, Ya Vazhu. A humorous folk song about a boy who wavers on commitment to an aggressive girl and finally flees. Arranged by H. Kytasty.
  4. Village Justice -- Sils'kyj Advokat. A satirical folk song about a village lawyer, adapted at the turn of the century by the bandurist M. Domontovych.
  5. Three Merry Folk Songs -- V'yazanka. Arranged by Danylo Pika.
  6. Song of Yurij Tiutiunnyk -- Pisnya Pro Yuriya Tiutiunyka. Tiutiunnyk was the celebrated leader of the Ukrainian Cavalry who won renown in battles against the Bolshevik Army (1918-1921). This song was the first in a series of collaborations of composer H. Kytasty and author/lyricist Ivan Bahriany (1907-1963).

    Encores:

  7. Who's Courtyard is This? -- Oy Chyj Zhe Tse Dvir? A humorous song about a young man who states that he would marry the girl, but only if she was wealthy. Arrangement - M. Leontovych, for bandura - H. Kytasty.
  8. The Mighty Dnipro River -- Reve Ta Stohne. A musical adaptation of T. Shevchenko's testament in which the poet resolves never to rest until Ukraine is free.
  9. Play, Bandura! -- Hray, Banduro! A battle song composed by Ihor Shamo (1925-1982), with the Zaporozhian Kozaks calling on the bandura players to lead them into battle with songs of the beauty of the land they are defending. Lyrics -- D. Luczenko.

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UBC Concert Tour 1975

 

These selections were recorded live on 25 May 1975 at Queen Elizabeth Theatre in Toronto, Ontario.


PROGRAM

Side One

  1. Nechaj -- Nechay. An historical song arranged by Oleksander Koshyts (1875-1944).
  2. Freedom Fighter's Farewell -- Ijhav Strilets. This piece describes the parting of a strilets (Ukrainian soldier during World War I) and his loved one as he goes off to war. By Mykhajlo Hajvoronsky (1892-1949).
    The Guilder-rose in the Meadow -- Oy U Poli Chervona Kalyna. The kalyna (guilder-rose) is a symbol of Ukraine, and both the kalyna and the nation rise from the earth in this patriotic song. To many, this is an anthem second only to the official national anthem. Arranged by Borys Kudryk (1897-1952).
  3. Down There in the Valley -- Oy Tam Pry Dolyni. "... freedom fighters died in the battle." Arranged by Petro Potapenko (1914-1998).
  4. A Night in May -- Mayeva Nichka. Lyrics and music by Lev Lepky (1888-1971).
  5. You Promised, Fickle Maiden -- Kazala Divchyna. "... but wed another." Arranged by P. Potapenko.
  6. Forward -- Vpered. March of the Ukrainian Insurgent Army. Arranged by Volodymyr Bozhyk (1908-).
  7. I Would Play My Bandura -- Vzial By Ya Banduru. "... and reveal my soul." Arranged by H. Kytasty (1907-1984).
  8. Arise Ye People -- Vstavay Narode. Lyrics by Ivan Bahriany (1907-1963), music by H. Kytasty.

 

Side Two

  1. Longing for One's Homeland -- Zelenyj Hay. By Pavlo Hrabovsky (1864-1902).
  2. Motherland Ukraine -- Vkraino Maty. "... we have sworn our loyalty to thee." By Kyrylo Stetsenko (1882-1922).
  3. Piper, O Piper -- Didu Miy, Dudaryku. A children's song about their longing for the dudaryk, a player of the Ukrainian bagpipes (duda). Arranged by Mykola Leontovych (1877-1921).
  4. The Boat on the Waves -- Choven Khytayet'sya. "Sweetheart, sail with me and enjoy the beautiful breezy night on the lake." Arranged by Evhen Kozak (1907-1988).
  5. In the Garden with Godmother -- Sadom, Sadom, Kumasen'ko. A Ukrainian folk song arranged by H. Kytasty.
  6. Whose Courtyard is This? -- Oy Chyj Zhe Tse Dvir. A humorous song about a young man who states that he would marry the girl, but only if she was wealthy. Arrangement -- M. Leontovych, for bandura -- H. Kytasty.
  7. Swans -- Lebedi. Lyrics by M. Sytynka, music by H. Kytasty.
  8. Ash Trees -- Yaseny. Lovers plant an ash tree to symbolize their future happiness. Music by K. Kryvenky.
  9. Three Merry Folk Songs -- V'yazanka. Arranged by Danylo Pika.

 

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Christmas Carols

 

The Chorus' first Christmas recording was originally released as LP 13.


PROGRAM

Side One

  1. Silent Night -- Tykha Nich.This world-famous carol by Franz Gruber is performed by the Chorus in English as well as Ukrainian.
  2. It Came Upon a Midnight Clear By R. S. Wills.
  3. In the Town of Bethlehem -- Vo Vefleyemi. Arranged by Hryhory Kytasty.
    Rejoice All -- Vozveselimsja. "...God has come from heaven." Arranged by Stanislav Liudkevych (1879-1979).
    Carol of the Bells -- Shchedryk. An instrumental version of Schedryk, introduced on the American continent in the 1930's.
  4. Christmas Bells -- Rizdvyani Dzvony. Music by H. Koncevych, arranged by H. Kytasty.
  5. Let Us Sing Today -- Dnes' Poyushche. "... and rejoice together." Arranged by Kyrylo Stetsenko (1882-1922).

Side Two

  1. God Eternal -- Boh Predvichnyj. "... was born unto the world today."
  2. In the River Jordan -- Na Yordan'skiy Richtsi. "... the Virgin Mary bathed her newborn Son." Arranged by K. Stetsenko.
  3. Joyful Tidings -- Po Vsiomu Svitu. "... have spread over the world, the Virgin Mary has given birth." Arranged by K. Stetsenko.
  4. What is This Wonder -- Shcho To Za Predyvo. "... that has come over the world?" Arranged by Vasyl Barvinsky (1888-1963) and Volodymyr Bozhyk.
  5. A New Joy Has Descended -- Nova Radist' Stala. "... Christ is born, and the angels sing, proclaiming peace."
  6. Saints Sit -- Svjati Sydily. "... crushing stones for the building of a church." Arranged by V. Bozhyk.
  7. God Sees -- Oj Vydyt' Boh. "... the world in peril and sends His Son." Arranged by K. Stetsenko.


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Black Sea Tour, Ukraine

 

This is the Chorus' 27th North American-produced album, containing live recordings from their historic 1994 concert tour of southern Ukraine, including the region of Crimea. It was released as UBC CD 2 and UBC Cassette 8.


PROGRAM

Side One

  1. The Cherubic Hymn -- Kheruvymska. An integral part of the Eastern Rite Liturgy, this Cherubicon was penned by Ukraine's most prolific 18th century composer Dmytro Bortniansky (1751-1825), a contemporary of W. A. Mozart. Trio: Roman Kassaraba, Boris Kekish, and Mykola Kostiuk.
  2. I Do Not Regret the Years -- Ne Shoduyu Za Litami. '... but I do regret that I am not with you in my native land.' The last composition of the Chorus' longtime director Hryhory Kytasty. Lyrics -- Oleksander Pidsukha (1918-1990). Soloist: Ihor Kusznir.
  3. Play, Bandura! -- Hray, Banduro. A battle song composed by Ihor Shamo (1925-1982), with the Zaporozhian Cossacks (Kozaks) calling on the bandura players to lead them into battle with songs of the beauty of the land they are defending. Lyrics -- D. Luczenko.
  4. The Grove -- Hayu, Hayu. A folk song about love lost due to others' gossip and innuendo, arranged by the composer chiefly known for the piece Carol of the Bells, Mykola Leontovych (1877-1921). Soloist: Teodozij Pryshliak.
  5. Song of Yuriy Tiutiunnyk -- Pisnja Pro yurija Tiutiunyka. Tiutiunnyk was the celebrated leader of the Ukrainian Cavalry who won renown in battles against the Bolshevik Army (1918-1921). This song was the first in a series of collaborations of composer H. Kytasty with author/lyricist Ivan Bahriany (1907-1963). Duet: Roman Kassaraba and T. Pryshliak.
  6. Girl from Yalta -- Shu Yaltadan. A Crimean Tatar song arranged by the contemporary Tatar composer Iliasa Bashysh. Soloist: Pavlo Pysarenko.
  7. The Singing Forest -- Oj Divchyno Shumyt' Haj. A merry folk song about courtship and love, and how the young couple plans for the future. Arrangement -- Hryhory Kytasty.
  8. Too Much of a Girl! -- Oy Vazhu, Ya Vazhu. A humorous folk song about a boy who wavers on commitment to an aggressive girl and finally flees. Arrangement -- Hryhory Kytasty.
  9. Storm on the Black Sea (Duma) -- Burja Na Chornomu Moriu. This is an orchestrated work of a 16th century duma. This piece was written by Hnat Khotkevych, but was banned by Stalin due to its religious connotation. As the Kozaks set sail on the Black Sea - a storm engulfs them. They realize that it is the wrath of God and the one who had sinned needs to confess and throw himself into the sea to save the others... Soloists: Jerome Cisaruk and T. Pryshliak.

Side Two

  1. God Bless America Irving Berlin, one of the 20th century's most prolific songwriters, and the composer/lyricist of this piece, was born in Ukraine in 1888. The Chorus added this piece to their repertoire prior to their Carnegie Hall appearance in 1983 in honor of his 95th birthday.
  2. The Chumak Song -- Chumaky. A chumak was a teamster who led his salt-laden oxen carts along long, tortuous roads from the Black Sea and Crimea to the cities. This is a lament of one such chumak who comes to the end of his road, and has said farewell to his oxen... Arrangement -- Hryhory Kytasty. Soloist: Mykhail Newmerzyckyj.
  3. Play, Kobzar! -- Hray Kobzariu. The kobzar is asked to play as the Kozaks sing a joyful song and dance 'so that the earth trembles'. Composed by Hryhory Kytasty, the words are penned by Ukraine's 19th century bard Taras Shevchenko (1814-1861).
  4. The Clouds are Rising -- Vstaye Khmara. Ukraine laments its people's fate of bondage and serfdom through the words of T. Shevchenko. Composed by Vasyl Yemetz, the Chorus' founder and first director in 1918.
    The Gathering Eagles -- Haydamatska Pisnja. An historical song from the 18th century which tells of the liberation of Chyhyryn by Kozaks gathered with the speed of eagles to rise against the Polish gentry. Lyrics -- T. Shevchenko; music -- Kyrylo Stetsenko (1882-1922).
  5. The Slave Market in Kaffa -- Nevilnychyj Rynok U Kafi. This piece features the bandura as it paints the scene of a Turkish slave market at Kaffa, the present-day city of Feodosia in the Crimea, where Ukrainian men, women, and children were sold during the 16th and 17th centuries. While Turkish motifs are ever-pervasive throughout, in the end, it is a Ukrainian folk melody that finally emerges from the sounds of the market. Music -- H. Khotkevych. Prologue: Arnold Birko.
  6. Whose Courtyard is This? -- Oy Chyj Zhe Tse Dvir. A humorous song about a young man who states that he would marry the girl, but only if she was wealthy. Arrangement -- Hryhory Kytasty.
  7. The Carpathian Freedom Fighters -- Karpatski Sichovnyky. The Chorus concluded its Black Sea Tour program with this piece. Composed by Hryhory Kytasty with lyrics by Yar Slavutych, this piece recounts the fight for liberation of Carpatho-Ukraine in 1938, where Carpathian riflemen distinguished themselves in battle. In the final verse, the Black Sea (Chorne More) receives the fallen heroes as the bodies of the freedom fighters spill out of the Danube into the Ukrainian sea.
  8. Medley of Ukrainian Folk Songs -- V'yazanka Tankovych Pisen'. This first encore presents three popular and humorous folk songs.
  9. Freedom Fighter's Farewell -- Jihav Strilets. This piece describes the parting of a strilets (Ukrainian soldier during World War I) and his loved one as he goes off to war. Soloists: I. Kusznir and P Pysarenko.
    The Guilder-rose in the Meadow -- Oy U Poli Chervona Kalyna. The kalyna (guilder-rose) is a symbol of Ukraine, and both the kalyna and the nation rise from the earth in this patriotic song. To many, this is an anthem second only to the official national anthem.
  10. Ukrainian National Anthem -- Shche Ne Vmerla Ukraina. After decades of not being heard on Ukrainian soil, this became the official national anthem of Ukraine following its independence in 1991. Lyrics -- Pavlo Chubynsky (1839-1884); music -- Mykhajlo Verbytsky (1815-1870).


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Best of Kapella, vol. I

 

 

This cassette contains selections from early recording of the UBC. It was released during the Chorus' 75th Anniversary celebration.


PROGRAM

Side One

  1. Christ is Risen! -- Khrystos Voskres! "Christ is risen from the dead, conquering death by death, and to those in the graves bestowing life!" Arranged by Hryhory Kytasty.
  2. Oh! The Village is Already in Sight -- Oy Vydno Selo. Lyrics and music by Bohdan Lepkyj (1872-1941), arranged by Hryhory Kytasty.
  3. Battle of Konotop -- Poema Pro Konotopsku Bytvu. A poem about the victory of Ukrainian Kozaks over a massive Russian army in the 17th century. Lyrics by Petro Karpenko-Krynycia, music by Hryhory Kytasty.
  4. Oh, How Long Ago -- Yak Davno. "I left my Fatherland. Forgive me, my homeland, for parting with you -- I recall you and long for you every moment." Lyrics by Oleksander Pidsukha (1918-1990), arranged by Hryhory Kytasty.
  5. Duma About Kozak Nechaj -- Duma Pro Kozaka Nechay. Music by Denys Sichynskyj (1865-1909), arranged by Petro Potapenko.

Side Two

  1. The Neighbor's Girl -- Susidka. A Ukrainian folk song arranged by Yakiv Yatsynevych (1869-1945).
  2. The Divine Mother of Pochayiv -- Kant Pochaivskyj Bozhoj Materi. A song dedicated to the Virgin Mary, who, according to legend, miraculously appeared and saved the Pochayiv Monastery from the Tartars in the 15th century.
  3. The Sun is Shining -- Sontse Hrije. An arrangement by P. Potapenko based on lyrics by Taras Shevchenko (1814-1861).
  4. When the Cuckoo Called -- Zakuvala Ta Syva Zozulya. Lyrics taken from the drama Nazar Stodolya by T. Shevchenko, music arranged by Petro Nishchynsky (1832-1896).
  5. Oh, My Love -- Oy Ty Divchyno. A Ukrainian folk song arranged by Hryhory Kytasty.
  6. Potpourri of Traditional Melodies -- V'jazanka "Oy Hop Ty Ny Ny". Arranged by Danylo Pika.
  7. My Heart Fades -- Zelenaja Ta Lishchynon'ka. Arranged by Mykola Leontovych (1877-1921).
  8. Longing for Ukraine -- Zelenyj Haj. By P. Hrabowsky.
  9. Ash Trees -- Jaseny. Lovers plant an ash tree to symbolize their future happiness. Music by K. Kryvenky.


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Again With You, My Ukraine

 

 

A live recording of the Ukrainian Bandurist Chorus in concert in Kyiv, Ukraine, 8 June 1991. This was the Chorus' first concert tour of Ukraine since World War II.



PROGRAM

Side One

  1. Blessed is the man (Psalm 1) -- Blazhen Muzh. A vesper hymn based on the ancient Kyivan chant, arranged by Andrij Hnatyshyn (1906-1995).
  2. Testament -- Zapovid. Taras Shevchenko's testament to his Ukrainian brethren. Music by Hnat Khotkevych.
  3. Praise the Lord, O My Soul -- Blahoslovy Dushe Moya, Hospoda. Psalm 104, music by Kyrylo Stetsenko (1882-1922). Soloist: Petro Pacholuk.
  4. The Carpathian Freedom Fighters -- Karpatski Sichovnyky. Composed by Hryhory Kytasty with lyrics by Yar Slavutych, this piece recounts the fight for liberation of Carpatho-Ukraine in 1938, where Carpathian riflemen distinguished themselves in battle. In the final verse, the Black Sea (Chorne More) receives the fallen heroes as the bodies of the freedom fighters spill out of the Danube into the Ukrainian sea.
  5. Country Tavern -- Korchomka. Arranged by H. Khotkevych. Soloist: Pavlo Pysarenko.
  6. Swans -- Lebedi. Lyrics by M. Sytynka, music by Hryhory Kytasty. Soloist: Yurij Oryshkevych.
  7. Bayda -- A 16th century ballad about the capture of Prince Dmytro "Bajda" Vyshnevetsly by the Turkish Sultan. This epic poem is a dialogue between a defiant Bajda and the Sultan. Bajda manages to trick the and kill the Sultan before dying under torture. Arranged by H. Khotkevych. Soloists: Andrij Soroka and Bohdan Chaplynsky.

Side Two

  1. Play, Kobzar! -- Hray Kobzariu! The kobzar is asked to play as the Kozaks sing a joyful song and dance 'so that the earth trembles'. Composed by H. Kytasty, the words are penned by Ukraine's 19th century bard Taras Shevchenko (1814-1861).
  2. The Clouds are Rising -- Vstaye Khmara. Ukraine laments its people's fate of bondage and serfdom through the words of T. Shevchenko. Composed by Vasyl Yemetz, the Chorus' founder and first director in 1918.
    The Gathering Eagles -- Haydamatska Pisnya. An historical song from the 18th century which tells of the liberation of Chyhyryn by Kozaks gathered with the speed of eagles to rise against the Polish gentry. Lyrics -- T. Shevchenko; music -- K. Stetsenko.
  3. Freedom Fighter's Farewell -- Yihav Strilets. This piece describes the parting of a strilets (Ukrainian soldier during World War I) and his loved one as he goes off to war. Soloists: Ihor Kusznir and P. Pysarenko.
    The Guilder-rose in the Meadow -- Oy U Poli Chervona Kalyna. The kalyna (guilder-rose) is a symbol of Ukraine, and both the kalyna and the nation rise from the earth in this patriotic song. To many, this is an anthem second only to the official national anthem.
  4. The Slave Market in Kaffa -- Nevilnychyj Rynok U Kafi. This piece features the bandura as it paints the scene of a Turkish slave market at Kaffa, the present-day city of Feodosia in the Crimea, where Ukrainian men, women, and children were sold during the 16th and 17th centuries. While Turkish motifs are ever-pervasive throughout, in the end, it is a Ukrainian folk melody that finally emerges from the sounds of the market. Music -- H. Khotkevych. Prologue: Victor Mishalow.
  5. Storm on the Black Sea (Duma) -- Burya Na Chornomu Moriu. This is an orchestrated work of a 16th century duma. This piece was written by H. Khotkevych, but was banned by Stalin due to its religious connotation. As the Kozaks set sail on the Black Sea - a storm engulfs them. They realize that it is the wrath of God and the one who had sinned needs to confess and throw himself into the sea to save the others... Soloists: Jerome Cisaruk and Teodozij Pryshliak.
  6. Arise Ye People -- Vstan' Narode. Lyrics by Ivan Bahriany (1907-1963), music by Hryhory Kytasty. Soloist: J. Cisaruk.


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Christmas Night

 

During the Christmas season the Ukrainian countryside reverberates with the sounds of kolyadky and schedrivky - the holiday songs. A kolyadka is a Christmas carol, religious in content, primarily sung on Christmas Eve to commemorate the birth of the Lord. A schedrivka is a traditional chant stemming from pagan times. It is sung on New Year's Eve, wishing the master and his household good health, wealth, and a plentiful harvest.

This digital recording was released simultaneously as UBC LP 22 as well as UBC Cassette 3.


PROGRAM

Side One

  1. God is With Us -- Z Nami Boh. Excerpts from Christmas Vesper chants.
  2. Kolyady -- A medley of Christmas Carols from the opera Christmas Night by Mykola Lysenko (1842-1912).
  3. The Stately Walk of a Peacock (Pavochka) -- Pavochka Khodyt'. A fair maiden attempts to rival the beauty of a peacock.
  4. Carol of the Bells (Schedryk) -- Shchedryk. The original version of Carol of the Bells, introduced on the American continent in the 1930's. Arranged by Mykola Leontovych (1877-1921).

Side Two

  1. Kolyada-kolyadnytsya -- An exuberant children's song which ends with the children winning a nickel from the host. Arranged by Pylyp Kozycky (1893-1960).
  2. The Playful Nanny-goat -- Koza. The nanny-goat was one of the personages in the Ukrainian medieval Christmas pageant. This song describes her antics. Arranged by M. Leontovych
  3. Fantasia -- Instrumental fantasy based on traditional Carols. Arranged by Zenovii Lavryshyn (1945-).
  4. Kolyada Songs -- Kolyadni Pisni. A medley of holiday melodies.

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December 3, 2012

 


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